Swimmer's Ear
Newsletter of the Potomac Valley Masters Committee
May 2002


    Table of Contents
  1. Note from the Chair
  2. Articles and Interviews
  3. Congratulations
  4. Today's Quote and Jokes
  5. Meet News
  6. Corrections
  7. Announcements
  8. Classifieds
  9. Photo Credits
  10. Events Calendar

    Newsletter Schedule
  • February (deadline: January 15)
  • May (deadline: April 15)
  • September (deadline: August 15)
  • December (deadline: November 15)

1.  Note from the Chair

Eric Nordlund

The current and former chairs, Eric Nordlund and Debbie Morrin-Nordlund, bought a new home in College Park, Maryland on April 18. Eric will be back with "Notes from the Chair" in the next issue.


turtle



2.  Articles and Interviews


C.J. Lockman Hall

Sport Psychology - Read All About It
by CJ Lockman Hall, M.A.

Many good sport psychology books dot bookstore shelves. Here are a few of my favorites:

Books by Keith Bell
Upbeat books by this sport psychologist and Masters swimmer include: Championship Sports Psychology, The Nuts and Bolts of Psychology for Swimmers, and You Only Feel Wet When You're Out of the Water.

Awaken the Olympian Within: Stories from America's Greatest Olympic Motivators
Athletes share stories of challenge and triumph, and the value of hard work, discipline, and character; edited by swimmer John Naber, winner of four gold medals and a silver medal at the 1976 Olympic Games. (I confess that I still have a photo of a very handsome John Naber with me from my googly-eyed teenage years.)

The Name of the Game is Life (Robert Shook and Ramon Greenwood)
Athletes-turned-busines speople share their thoughts on how participating in sports positively influenced their lives, work habits, and leadership abilities.

For the Love of the Game
Even if you are not a basketball fan, Michael Jordan's intensity and his desire to improve and succeed are inspirational; Jordan talks about his use of imagery.

Mental Training for Peak Performance (Steve Ungerleider)
Sport psychologist Steve Ungerleider combines theory and practice to help readers achieve peak performance; includes mental training techniques from many athletes as well as sport-specific mental practice.

Life is Not a Game of Perfect (Bob Rotella)
Rotella is the former head of the sport psychology department at UVA and currently consults with athletes and business people. Life delves into the idea of Ïreal talentÓ and how anyone can develop it.

In the Zone (Michael Murphy and Rhea White)
A look at transcendent experiences in sport; chapters include mystical sensations, altered perceptions, extraordinary feats, and mind/body training. Murphy is a co-founder of the Esalen Institute.

In Pursuit of Excellence: How to Win in Sport and Life and Psyching for Sport (Terry Orlick)
This well-respected sport psychologist writes about the "wheel of excellence" and how to develop a refined mental game plan.

CJ Lockman Hall, M.A., your PV treasurer, swims and coaches with the Montgomery Ancient Mariners. Visit www.mindandsport.com for more on sport performance and sport enjoyment.

Holly Donnelly

Tips for First-Time Masters Meets Participants
by Holly Donnelly

It can be hard to know what to expect when you start swimming meets for the first time or after a long time out of the water. Here are some tips to help you get started.

  1. Note deadlines for registration. Many meets do not allow same-day entries. Be sure to mail in any forms, fees and a copy of your USMS card.
  2. Get there in time to warm up. Master's meets move along quickly. Plan to arrive in plenty of time to change and be in the pool at the designated warm-up time. Often, there is not a lot of space set aside for warm up and you don't want to risk going into an event cold.
  3. Be kind to your friends and family. Swim meets can be boring for non-participants. Make sure your guests have something to read and that children have toys or games to occupy them.
  4. Check equipment before the meet. Bring extra items you can't live without like suits, caps and goggles.
  5. Bring a stopwatch and ask a friend to take splits if you want them. Most Masters meets will not provide splits.
  6. Practice your starts during the warm-up. The blocks might be different from what you're used to.
  7. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Masters swimmers are friendly folks. They're happy to steer you in the right direction if you have a question!
beach
Nick Olmos-Lau

Practicing for the Chesapeake Bay Swim
"Different Strokes for Different Folks"

by Nick Olmos-Lau, M.D.

The 4.4 mile Great Chesapeake Bay Swim has become one of the most popular open water events in the Washington Metropolitan area. It is a well organized race in beautiful surroundings, with a great atmosphere and a festive feel. Because of its popularity, the race has been limited to 600 entrants. It usually fills up within a few days of the opening registration date in early February. If you visit the web site right now (March), you will find that the 4.4 mile event is already closed. You can probably still enter the 1 mile event, which can serve as a qualifier for next year's event.

Training for the 4.4 mile open water event requires additional time in the water and longer training swims than those completed by the average competitive masters pool swimmer. For those not accustomed to this type of extra yardage in their training program, the introduction should be gradual in order to avoid injuries. Each adult has physical limitations that will determine his or her tolerance to repetitive stress. In addition, other metabolic and physical attributes may determine if a 2 hour swim practice or a 2 mile lake swim will bring a person to the edge of his or her comfort limit. Individual constitutional features can determine a person's propensity to excel in either longer or shorter events. Some of these features include predominant muscle fiber type (fast or slow twitch), aerobic capacity, and maximal oxygen uptake by the lungs (VO2 max).

Although these structural and physiologic features can determine whether or not you are suited for longer events, you can always increase the limits by training. However, major orthopedic limitations, joint injuries, or health attributes such as an obstructive lung problem (COPD), a restrictive lung problem (asthma) induced by either cold temperatures or prolonged exercise, heart disease, or anaphylactic (severe allergic) reactions to jelly fish stings, should all be considered seriously. These may, if present, impose limitations to prolonged open water exposure.

One element that is not often recognized as a limiting factor is a person's level of confidence or fear in the open water and around marine life. The lack of walls, a floor to stand on, or lines to grab may induce serious psychological distress in some people. In order to undertake the open water challenge, a person must feel confident in rough conditions or when there is no other swimmer present nearby in the water. For many people the 4.4 mile distance of the Chesapeake Bay span might seem daunting. For others, however, it may be a healthy and reasonable goal in swimming. It is always important to listen to your body and to know your limits.

How do you know if your background or training is sufficient to consider the 4.4 mile Bay challenge? The answer may seem obvious for an experienced swimmer. However, for someone having recently started a Masters program it might be more difficult to determine. To begin with, there are certain minimal speed and endurance requirements that are mandated by the event organizers. You must be able to swim a mile in open water in 40 minutes or less. If you have not had this experience, you must have been able to swim 3 miles in a pool in 2 hrs and 14 minutes or better, having done so within the previous 2 years. There are rules dictating a time limit for completion of the Bay swim, because safety is of the utmost importance in outdoor swimming. If you don't think you can complete the distance of your outdoor swim in a pool within the maximum time designated, it would be imprudent to attempt the swim in open water until you've done some additional training. It invariably takes a considerably longer time to swim a given distance in the open water than in the controlled environment of a swimming pool.

So, what do you need to do to train and prepare yourself? You should begin with the regular 3-practice-per-week regimen of 1 - 1.5 hour practices covering about 3.5 km each practice, plus necessary sprints. You also need to do additional longer swims. These longer swims should be done on 1 or 2 additional days, brining your pool time up to 4-5 days per week. The long swims can be done in the pool during the winter, but they should preferably be done in open water when it becomes warm enough in the Spring. The object is to gradually increase the distance you cover either as a long swim or shorter repetitive swims at a faster pace. The yardage you cover in each long swim should eventually add up to the distance you intend to swim in the event you are training for.

About 2 weeks prior to the Bay swim you should to be able to comfortably complete at least a 4 mile swim simulating the event, with either no rest or one rest for a drink in the middle. This will give you time for a 2 week taper prior to the event. If you are unable to accomplish this, it does not make any sense to attempt the race in open water with all the associated dangers and potential complications: current, wind, surf, and foul weather. It is best to duplicate the swim in an open water location before the event. But please remember the cardinal rule of open water swimming: always have a training partner. Follow the buddy system and avoid swimming in open water by yourself. There is no justification for placing yourself at such a risk.

Open water swimming requires different skills than are necessary for pool swimming. Navigational skills are essential. For example, you must learn how to sight and swim simultaneously. Learning how to take advantage of the swells and surf for propulsion is also important. Having the flexibility to adjust your breathing pattern bilaterally according to the changing chop or swells of the water may be essential on a rough day with variable winds. These skills are best acquired by practicing swimming in open water. Expertise can also be gained by participation in shorter events or training swims of 1-3 miles either in the ocean or in lakes. The shorter swims will give you the confidence and experience to cope with the two major obstacles in open water: dehydration and hypothermia.

There have been years in which the Bay swim takes place in water temperatures in the upper 60s F. For a swimmer with a very low amount of body fat who is not accustomed to such low temperatures, even a wet suit may not be protective against this possibly life threatening exposure to cold. Hypothermia is extremely dangerous, and it is important to recognize the onset of the symptoms of this condition. These include uncontrollable shivering, fatigue, heaviness of the limbs, numbness in the hands or feet or around the mouth, lack of coordination, confusion, and slurred speech. These symptoms are aggravated if a person's body temperature falls below 95 F. At this point, cardiac arrest and unconsciousness could be imminent. A swimmer must be pulled out of the water before this occurs in order to prevent drowning. If you experience the early symptoms of hypothermia, such as uncontrollable shivering or numbness, talk to someone in a kayak or boat around you. If they make the decision to pull you out, certainly don't argue. Your life may be at stake. Remember that there is always next year.

Nutrition and hydration are vital in longer events. During your training for long swims it is important to hydrate with a sports drink every 15-20 minutes. For the Bay swim, you should hydrate prior to the race by drinking 4-6 oz of a sports drink during the waking hours of the day prior to the race. You should also drink 16 oz of fluid half an hour prior to the onset of the race. Consider stopping in the middle to drink 4 to 6 ounces of a sport drink. If done properly, this brief break should only take about 30 seconds, and it may lower your overall race time by enhancing your endurance, energy, and sense of well being.

The Chesapeake Bay waters can be very rough at times, and some people can get sea sickness, as manifested by nausea and diziness. If you have this problem and are considering using a sea sickness medication to prevent it, be sure to use it during a training swim to see if it affects you adversely. Do not try to use it at the time of the race for the first time.

Open water swimming offers a totally different perspective on our sport. Once you have completed your first open water swim, you will join a tight-knit club of happy and eccentric souls. The difference between pool and open water swimming is analogous to the difference between running on a treadmill and running in a forest. What a feeling! As far as I'm concerned, there is nothing in the world like it. Go out and enjoy yourself, safely.

Bike Shop

College Park Bike Shop - Alive and Well
by Cheryl Wagner

The College Park Bike Shop is alive and well, having survived the onslaught of NCAA midnight revelers on April 1. Located just off of Route 1 on 4360 Knox Road (301-864-2211) , the popular haunt of local area bikers and triathletes was vandalized by raucous crowds after the University of Maryland Terrapins beat the Indiana Hoosiers. Vandals threw a two-by-four through a front window and took approximately 15 bicycles. On the following day, manager Chad said, "They worked me over pretty good. But we're open for business as usual. Tell everyone to come on in."



3.  Congratulations!


PV Results from February 2002
Virginia Masters Invitational Meet

by Debbie Morrin-Nordlund

W 19-24
Christine Spaulding(ALEX)3rd 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle,2nd 100 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM

W 25-29
Jennifer Paynter (ALEX) 2nd 200 freestyle, 2nd 500 freestlye, 2nd 1000 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 2nd 100 backstroke, 2nd 200 backstroke
Amy Weiss (ANCM) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 100 breaststroke

W 30-34
Kiran Beyer (UNAT) 2nd 1650 freestyle
Heather Coulson-Moore (GMUP) 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 IM
Christina Hokenson (GMUP) 2nd 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle
Carole Kammel (ANCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 2nd 400 IM
Jeri Ramsbottom (ANCM) 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke, 2nd 100 IM

W 35-39
Barbara Clifford-Dicks (GMUP) 2nd 50 backstroke, 2nd 100 backstroke, 2nd 200 backstroke, 2nd 50 butterfly
Cheryl Ward (GMUP) 1st 200 backstroke, 1st 200 IM
Susan Williams (ANCM) 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 50 butterfly

W 50-54
Myriam Pero (ANCM) 2nd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 2nd 1650 freestyle

M 19-24
Daniel Jent (ALEX) 1st 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 3rd 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle
Drew Killian (ALEX) 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 1st 100 IM

M 30-34
Jeffrey Roddin (ANCM) 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM, 1st 200 IM
Neill Williams (UNAT) 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 100 IM, 2nd 200 IM, 1st 400 IM

M 35-39
Doug Chestnut (GMUP) 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 2nd 100 butterfly, 1st 200 IM, 1st 400 IM
Wally Dicks (ANCM) 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 100 butterfly

M 40-44
Denis Crean (TCSD) 1st 1000 freestyle, 1st 400 IM
David Reene (UNAT) 3rd 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle

M 45-49
Kerry Dearfield (DCM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 3rd 50 butterfly, 3rd 100 butterfly
John Feinstein (ANCM) 3rd 100 freestyle, 3rd 50 backstroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly
John Hudson (GMUP) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 1st 1000 freestyle
Norman Weinberg (FXCM) 2nd 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke

M 50-54
David Oates (GMUP) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 100 butterfly

M 55-59
Tim Timmons (GMUP) 1st 500 freestlye, 1st 50 backstroke, 2nd 100 backstroke, 2nd 200 backstroke, 3rd 50 butterfly, 1st 200 IM

M 60-64
Don Parsons (ALEX) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 1st 1000 freestyle, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 100 IM, 1st 200 IM

M 65-69
Niel Sween (AMSC) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke, 1st 50 breaststroke


PV Results from Maryland Masters Winter Meet
by Debbie Morrin-Nordlund

W 19-24
Katie Ludman (ALEX) 2nd 100 backstroke, 2nd 100 IM, 2nd 200 IM
Michelle Luke (GERM) 1st 50 freestyle
Christine Spaulding (ALEX) 3rd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 100 IM
Courtney Giulioni (HCYM) 2nd 50 backstroke, 3rd 50 butterfly

W 25-29
Holly Donnelly (ANCM) 3rd 100 freestyle, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly
Alexandra Giannini (ALEX) 2nd 200 freestyle, 1st 100 butterfly
Jessica Klotz (ANCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke
Sarah McCamey (RMST) 1st 500 freestyle
Jennifer Paynter (ALEX) 3rd 200 freestyle, 3rd 500 freestyle, 2nd 100 backstroke
Christina West (DCAC) 3rd 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 IM

W 30-34
Susan Dudley (ALEX) 3rd 200 freestyle
Christina Hokenson (GMUP) 2nd 50 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM Also pentathlon winner
Carole Kammel (ANCM) 2nd 100 freestyle, 1st 100 breaststroke
Cherie Landriau (RMST) 2nd 50 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke
Jeri Ramsbottom (ANCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 100 IM
April Sheapp (ANCM) 3rd 100 backstroke

W 35-39
Barbara Clifford-Dicks (GMUP) 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke, 1st 100 IM
Linda Costello (ANCM) 3rd 50 freestyle, 2nd 50 breaststroke
Debbie Morrin-Nordlund (TERR) 2nd 100 backstroke
Beth Westerman-Koback (GERM) 2nd 100 butterfly

W 40-44
Penny Bates (ANCM) 2nd 500 freestyle, 3rd 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM, 1st 200 IM, 1st 400 IM Also high point winner
Anita Callahan (GMUP) 2nd 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle
Marsha Henry (GERM) 2nd 100 backstroke
April Oliver (ANCM) 1st 50 butterfly,1st 100 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM

W 45-49
Vivian Young (DCAC) 1st 50 freestyle, 3rd 100 freestyle, 3rd 200 freestyle,1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke

W 50-54
Denise Kirwan (DCM) 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 200 backstroke, 1st 400 IM

W 55-59
Nancy Kirkendall (DCM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 3rd 500 freestyle, 2nd 100 backstroke, 1st 100 IM
Margot Pettijohn (ANCM) 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 1st 200 butterfly. 1st 200 IM, 1st 400 IM

W 60-64
Joann Leilich (DCM) 1st 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 100 breaststroke
Beth Schreiner (DCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 IM Also high point and pentathlon winner

W 85-89
Mary Lathram (DCM) 2nd 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke Also high point winner
Anne Walkter (DCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke

M 19-24
Jason Bricker (DCAC) 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke
Michael Graham (DCAC) 2nd 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle
Matthew Holder (DCAC) 1st 100 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM, 1st 200 IM, 1st 400 IM
Daniel Jent (ALEX) 1st 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 100 IM
Kyle Kranz (HCYM) 3rd 100 freestyle, 3rd 50 backstroke, 3rd 50 butterfly
Jeremy Rausch (DCAC) 3rd 50 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 2nd 50 breaststroke, 2nd 100 breaststroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM Also high point and pentathlon winner

M 25-29
James Crowder (TERR) 1st 200 backstroke, 2nd 100 breaststroke, 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 200 IM
Kyal Hackett (GERM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 1st 100 breaststroke
Greg Leo (DCAC) 3rd 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 3rd 200 IM, 2nd 400 IM
Bryan Main (GERM) 2nd 50 Backstroke, 2nd 100 IM
Andrew Martin (TERR) 1st 50 breaststroke
Steve McCamey (RMST) 3rd 50 freestyle, 2nd 500 freestyle

M 30-34
Thomas Buerger (DCAC) 3rd 50 breaststroke, 2nd 100 breaststroke
Michael Grill (RMST) 1st 100 backstroke, 3rd 100 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM
Jeffrey Hoyle (TERR) 3rd 100 breaststroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly
Michael Jacobson (HCYM) 1st 50 backstroke, 3rd 100 backstroke, 1st 200 backstroke, 1st 400 IM
Peter Koback (GERM) 3rd 50 freestyle, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 3rd 50 butterfly
Kei Koizumi (DCAC) 2nd 200 backstroke, 2nd 200 breaststroke, 2nd 400 IM
Michael Lee (TERR) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 2nd 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM Also high point and pentathlon winner
effrey Roddin (ANCM) 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 100 IM, 1st 200 IM
Daniel Rudolph (ANCM) 2nd 100 backstroke, 2nd 200 IM

M 35-39
Eric Czander (DCAC) 3rd 200 freestyle, 1st 200 backstroke
Wally Dicks (ANCM) 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly
Ken Keer (HCYM) 2nd 100 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 2nd 50 breaststroke, 3rd 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM
Marc LeGoff (DCAC) 2nd 100 breaststroke, 2nd 200 breaststroke, 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly, 1st 200 IM Also high point winner
Eric Nordlund (TERR) 3rd 50 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle
David Ofstead (HCYM) 2nd 500 freestyle, 2nd 100 butterfly
Michael Shea (DCAC) 3rd 100 breaststroke
Raymond Toy (HCYM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 3rd 100 butterfly
Karl Wunderlich (GERM) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 3rd 50 backstroke, 3rd 50 breaststroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 100 IM Also high point and pentathlon winner
Mark Young (GERM) 3rd 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle

M 40-44
Clay Britt (ANCM) 1st 100 backstroke, 1st 100 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM
Denis Crean (TCSD) 2nd 500 freestyle, 2nd 100 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly, 1st 200 IM, 1st 400 IM
Michael Fell (ANCM) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke
Ross Kennard (HCYM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 3rd 50 backstroke, 2nd 50 butterfly
Rory Lewis (ANCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 3rd 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM Also pentathlon winner
Charlie McManus (DCAC) 3rd 100 breaststroke
Douglas Prince (FXCM) 3rd 200 freestyle
William Roberts (ALEX) 3rd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle
Robert Stofferson (DCAC) 2nd 200 butterfly

M 45-49
Jose Cunningham (DCAC) 1st 50 freestyle, 2nd 50 backstroke, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 IM Also pentathlon winner
John Feinstein (ANCM) 2nd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 2nd 500 freestyle, 3rd 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 3rd 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 butterfly
Robert Hansen (GMUP) 3rd 50 breaststroke, 3rd 100 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM
effrey Mead (DCAC) 3rd 50 freestyle, 3rd 100 freestyle, 3rd 100 backstroke
Dawson Nash (DCAC) 2nd 200 backstroke
Ray Novitske (ALEX) 3rd 100 breaststroke
Mark Pugliese (DCRP) 2nd 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 2nd 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM
Mark Walters (GERM) 1st 200 butterfly, 3rd 200 IM, 3rd 400 IM
Norman Weinberg (FXCM) 3rd 500 freestyle, 2nd 100 backstroke

M 50-54
John Abbott (GERM) 3rd 50 backstroke
Bruce Amato (ANCM) 2nd 50 backstroke, 3rd 100 IM
David Harmon (ANCM) 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle
Charlie Hoffman (TERR) 2nd 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke, 3rd 50 butterfly
Larry Sloan (GMUP) 2nd 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 2nd 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly

M 55-59
Paul Grueneberger (DCM) 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle
Timothy Timmons (GMUP) 3rd 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 1st 100 backstroke, 3rd 100 IM

M 60-64
Richard Durham (GERM) 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke
Don Parsons (ALEX) 1st 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 500 freestyle, 2nd 50 breaststroke, 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 100 IM, 1st 400 IM Also high point and pentathlon winner
Kenneth Wall (GERM) 2nd 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle, 2nd 200 freestyle, 2nd 500 freestyle, 1st 50 backstroke, 3rd 50 breaststroke, 3rd 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM

M 70-74
Donald Messer (DCRP) 1st 50 butterfly, 1st 100 butterfly, 1st 200 butterfly, 1st 100 IM

M 80-84
Harvey Geller (TERR) 2nd 50 freestyle, 1st 100 freestyle, 1st 200 freestyle, 1st 50 breaststroke, 1st 100 breaststroke, 1st 200 breaststroke High point winner

fish


PV Results from Chinn Aquatics Meet
by Debbie Morrin-Nordlund

W 19-24
Anastasia Kay (GMUP) 1st 200 and 500 freestyle, 100 and 200 backstroke
Gena Saulitis (FXCM) 1st 100 freestyle, 2nd 50 breaststroke, 50 butterfly and 100 IM

W 25-29
Alexandra Giannini (ALEX) 1st 200 freestyle and 200 butterfly
Joanne Hopkins (FXCM) 1st 500 freestyle
Elaina Moy (GMUP) 2nd 100 freestyle, 3rd 100 IM

W 30-34
Heather Coulson-Moore (GMUP) 1st 200 backstroke, 100 butterfly, 200 IM
Marisa Frieder (TERR) 2nd 50 and 100 breaststroke, 50 butterfly, 3rd 100 IM
Christina Hokenson (GMUP) 1st 50, 100 and 200 freestyle, 50 butterfly, 2nd 100 IM

W 35-39
Barbara Clifford-Dicks (GMUP) 1st 50 freestyle, 50 and 200 backstroke, 2nd 100 IM
Linda Costello (ANCM) 2nd 50 breaststroke
Cindy Dobyns (TCSD) 1st 100 freestyle and 50 butterfly, 3rd 50 freestyle and 100 IM
Deborah Morrin-Nordlund (TERR) 1st 100 backstroke, 200 breaststroke, 2nd 100 breaststroke
Cheryl Ward (GMUP) 1st 200 freestyle and 400 IM

W 40-44
Anita Callahan (GMUP) 1st 50 freestyle, 100 freestyle, 2nd 100 butterfly
Penny Bates (ANCM) 1st 100 butterfly, 200 IM, 400 IM, 2nd 200 breaststroke, 100 IM

W 55-59
Nancy Kirkendall (DCM) 1st 50 backstroke, 2nd 50, 100 freestyle, 100 backstroke

W 60-64
Joann Leilich (DCM) 1st 100 backstroke, 200 breaststroke, 200 IM
Beth Schreiner (DCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 50 butterfly, 100 IM, 2nd 50 backstroke

W 65-69
Jayne Bruner (DCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 200 breaststroke, 100 butterfly

M 19-24
Daniel Jent (ALEX) 1st 50, 100 and 200 freestyle

M 25-29
James Crowder (TERR) 1st 100 freestyle, 400 IM

M 30-34
Michael Lee (TERR) 1st 100 freestyle
Daniel Rudolph (ANCM) 1st 200, 400 IM, 2nd 200 freestyle
Ed Switzer (TERR) 1st 200 freestyle, 50 butterfly

M 35-39
Paul McNeil (GMUP) 1st 100 and 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 and 500 freestyle
Eric Nordlund (TERR) 1st 50 and 500 freestyle, 50 backstroke

M 40-44
Denis Crean (TCSD) 1st 200 butterfly, 100 and 400 IM, 2nd 100 butterfly
Rory Lewis (ANCM) 1st 50 and 100 freestyle, 100 butterfly, 2nd 50 breaststroke
Douglas Prince (FXCM) 2nd 200 freestyle
Bill Roberts (ALEX) 1st 200 freestyle, 50 butterfly, 3rd 100 butterfly

M 45-49
Kerry Dearfield (DCM) 1st 50 freestyle, 2nd 50 and 100 butterfly
Don Edgell (DCM) 2nd 200 and 500 freestyle, 100 breaststroke, 3rd 100 freestyle
Robert Hansen (GMUP) 1st 50, 100 and 200 butterfly, 2nd 100 freestyle
John Hudson (GMUP) 1st 100, 200 and 500 freestyle
Ray Novitske (ALEX) 1st 50 backstroke, 50, 100 and 200 breaststroke, 2nd 100 IM

M 50-54
Bruce Amato (ANCM) 2nd 50 and 200 freestyle, 3rd 100 freestyle
Larry Sloan (GMUP) 1st 50 freestyle, 2nd 100 freestyle

M 55-59
Paul Grueneberger (DCM) 1st 100 and 200 freestyle, 2nd 50 freestyle
Timothy Timmons (GMUP) 1st 50 butterfly, 2nd 50 backstroke, 3rd 50 and 200 freestyle

M 60-64
Don Parsons (ALEX) 1st 50 freestyle, 50, 100 and 200 butterfly, 100 IM

M 65-69
David Gregg (FXCM) 2nd 50 and 100 breaststroke
Niel Sween (ANCM) 1st 50, 100 and 200 backstroke



4.  Quotes and Jokes


Quotes
"I don't measure a man's success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom."
- General George S. Patton

"A lake is the landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature."
- Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

Humor
Two Blondes playing Trivial Pursuit: First Blonde: "If you are in a vacuum and someone calls your name, can you hear it?"
Second Blonde: "Is it on or off?"

"Karaoke bars combine two of the nation's greatest evils: people who shouldn't drink with people who shouldn't sing."
--Tom Dreesen

Q: Why do motorcycle gangs wear black leather?
A: Because white chiffon wrinkles too easily.

Foregone Conclusion

  • The Japanese eat very little fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than the British or Americans.
  • On the other hand, the French eat a lot of fat and also suffer fewer heart attacks than the British or Americans.
  • The Japanese drink very little red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than the British or Americans.
  • The Italians drink excessive amounts of red wine and also suffer fewer heart attacks than the British or Americans.

Conclusion: Eat and drink what you like. It's speaking English that kills you.


Late for Practice. . .
Late for Practice


Cheryl Wagner

On Turning 50
by Cheryl Wagner

There are good things about turning 50 ----- really! And I?m not just talking about knowing who won World War II, being able to speak in complete sentences, and being able to make change in your head. Being 50 means you can remember wonderful things such as:

  • a time when Johnny Weismuller's freestyle wasn't called the Tarzan drill
  • who Esther Williams was and why it's important to have fifty women in matching white suits diving off varied level platforms
  • a time before swim goggles, and
  • working out without a time clock, paddles, or fins.

Of course, the best thing is telling younger swimmers how rough we had it. "We didn?t even have water. We had to smash hydrogen and oxygen molecules together and make our own..."

swimmer



5.  Meet News


Penny Bates

Adventures in New Zealand
by Penny Bates

Marshall Greer, Mark Pugliese and I attended the Ninth FINA World Masters Swimming Championships in Christchurch, New Zealand last month. New Zealand is a beautiful country of almost four million mostly friendly people, 50 million sheep, and 70 million non-native red bush-tailed possums who eat 21 thousand tons of vegetation every night. In an effort to reduce the possum population, a wide variety of possum products, including socks, gloves and sweaters are produced. In 1893 New Zealand was the first country to give women the vote and is known as something of a social laboratory.

Christchurch is located on the east coast of the South Island on the Canterbury Plain, the flattest land I've ever seen. Just south of the city, three extinct volcanoes form a hilly peninsula with two scenic harbors, Lyttleton and Akaroa, where you can swim with endangered HectorĖs Dolphins (while wearing a wet suit) or do a 3K open water swim (without wearing a wetsuit) in 60 degree water.

After 26 hours of flying and sitting around in airports, I arrived at my Christchurch hotel at nine a.m. three days before the meet started. Since my room wasnĖt yet ready, I walked four blocks to a new 25-meter pool and went for a swim. Cost: about $1.75 US dollars. Then I walked into one of the internet cafes that are on every block and let everyone at home know I'd arrived safely. Most cafes charged about one New Zealand dollar for 10-15 minutes use. With one U.S. dollar converting to about $2.25 New Zealand dollars, this was a great deal. Sandwiches all over town were $4, or about $1.75 US. I also discovered how good cranberry chicken pizza can be. Since the food was quite good, sometimes I had two lunches per day! One Japanese swimmer liked the food so much, he took a picture of his sandwich.

The brand new competition pool at Queen Elizabeth II Park is about 10 kilometers from the city center. It must have been fast as 104 world records were set. Unfortunately the new leisure pool with slides, a lazy river, hot tubs and other unimaginably fun stuff, is not due to open until June. The meet itself was not too large with about 3000 swimmers, divers, water polo players and synchronized swimmers. Consequently, days at the pool were not marathons like the last world championships in Munich. If you want to go to one of these meets, I recommend going to one that is at least a 12-hour flight from nearly anywhere in the world!

During the days preceding the meet, I was able to see quite a bit of Christchurch, including the International Antarctic Center, the stepping off point for most Antarctic expeditions, and the Christchurch Museum where I saw everything from dinosaur bones to Queen Victoria's shoes.

Mark and I experienced New Zealand hospitality after taking the city bus in the general direction of the Willowbank Wildlife Reserve for dinner and a tour of the "New Zealand Experience". After wandering rural roads in ever increasing darkness for quite a while and wondering if we were anywhere near where we were supposed to be, we met a local couple who gave us directions and told us to stop back at their house for coffee and they would drive us back to our hotels.

Even though I suspected they must be serial killers, we did stop at their house and they did give us a ride back into town. They seemed quite nice, but since they dropped me off first and since Mark and I were not swimming on the same days for the next four days, I wondered if he was still alive. Fortunately, my imagination is overactive and when I returned to the pool, I found he was alive and well and on what he termed his "ironman day," had won the 200 back and placed third in the 100 fly. I later met other complete strangers who offered rides and overnight stays in their homes. A bus driver stopped the bus to help a lost boy crying by the side of the road. I couldn't help but think that here, she may have run him over!

On the first day of the meet, I arrived at the pool with plenty of time before my 800 free. Of course I forgot we were swimming two per lane, but since I am compulsively early, I still had a few hours to spare. The lane assignments showed I would be sharing a lane with Laura Vaca, who sat next to me on the flight from Los Angeles to Auckland. Laura swam for Mexico in the 1968 and 1972 Olympics and told me her goal was to catch me from 30 seconds behind. She was successful. I found that swimming long course with only one long course practice in six months is not so fun.

Marshall and I swam adequately. Mark had the meet of his life, winning the 50, 100 and 200 back and 50 fly, and finishing third in his initial attempt at his experimental event, 100 fly.

During a day off from the meet, I visited Kaikoura, about 100 miles north of Christchurch, and saw some adolescent sperm whales. Even though they are young, they are still large. On the way home, we stopped by the side of the road and found dozens of seals lying on rocks. Along the way were millions of sheep and several elk and deer farms. On another day, I went for a cruise in Akaroa Harbor where we saw Hector's Dolphins. I was able to return to Akaroa later and swim with the dolphins. These small black and white dolphins are found only off the coast of New Zealand and are the rarest marine dolphins in the world.
The open water swim on the last day of the meet was in beautiful Corsair Bay, in Lyttleton Harbor. Wet suits were not allowed. The day was sunny and the air temperature was in the seventies, but the water was a different story. Rumors placed the temperature anywhere between 16 and 19 degrees Celsius, or between 60.8 and 66.2 Fahrenheit, so I choose to believe it was at least 18. That was a mistake. Mark started off in the second wave and with my wave due to start in a few minutes, I stepped into water that was colder than any IĖd ever been in so I quickly got out. I waited another minute, waded out to my knees and seriously considered wading back out and getting dressed. But Mark already had left and I knew Robbie Allen would give me endless grief for being a wimp, so I walked up to the starting line. The woman standing next to me was covered head to toe in goose bumps. The gun went off and the two of us looked at each other and asked if we really were going to do this. We were. We are stupid.

Immediately, I was breathing like a horse in winter and gasping for air. Within a few minutes, I realized all my extra lunches werenĖt helping keep me warm and my feet were pretty numb. The first leg of the triangular course was endless and a bit rough but I finally rounded the buoy and then promptly started to dry heave and wonder why I do these things. I looked around and admired the scenery but it didnĖt help me forget how cold it was.

The second leg was over relatively quickly and I rounded the second buoy and headed for the finish. By this time I was not confident of my ability to finish, or even locate the finish, and there were few people around to follow. I zig zagged my way in, with the third leg seeming nearly as long as the first, not feeling my feet and questioning my sanity.

At the finish, people were waiting with piles of gray wool blankets (sheep products, not possum). I told the first person I saw that I was very cold and he said he would get me straightaway to a hospital! Since I wasnĖt quite that bad, I passed on the offer, but went directly to the hot shower where I discovered Mark had survived as well. After a long shower, putting on eight layers of clothes, consuming hot tea, soup and mashed potatoes (I passed on the critter stew) and running for about ten minutes, I was fine. Other people werenĖt so lucky and many were taken to the hospital. If I ever die in one of these events, it will be Robbie's fault.

I ended up sixth in my age group and Mark was fifth in his. The second, third and fourth finishers overall were women and two of them were in my age group. ArenĖt we supposed to get slower as we get older?

After the meet, Marshall went off to jet-boat and visit a sheep ranch and then happily flew to the Great Barrier Reef for eight days of scuba diving. Mark and I flew home and worked on our jet lag. After a week of being tired and grumpy, I would still return to New Zealand in a minute.

Complete results from the meet are at www.eventnz.co.nz, www.eventnz.co.nz, or www.swiminfo.com/results. Information on possum products is at www.nzpossumproducts.co.nz.


Maryland Masters Winter Meet

Holly Donnelly
Holly Donnelly (ANCM) swimming butterfly

Margot Pettijohn
Margot Pettijohn (ANCM) swimming butterfly

For complete results see: http://maryland.usms.org.


Albatross Open SCM Meet

John and Rob Tom and friends

John Feinstein & Rob Dobry

Tom Denes and friends


David and Nancy Susan and Joann

David Gregg & Nancy Kirkendall

Susan Dudley & Joann Leilich


Anna Emad, Cheryl, Chris

Anna Ratlidff

Emad Elshafei, Cheryl Wagner, Chris Benedick


Annemeik Holly

Annemeik Van Der Sluijs

Holly Donnelly


April and Amy William and Catherine

April Oliver and Amy Weiss

William Sax and Catherine Geiszler


Brian and Mike Lisa and Dad

Brian Evans and Mike Grill

Lisa Van Pelt-Diller and Dad

For complete Albatross Open results see www.pvmasters.org/results.htm



6.  Correction

In the previous edition of the Swimmer's Ear, in the article about Max VO2, the following statement should have mentioned that the female was walking as fast as possible without breaking into a jog:

"Here is a formula for computing your own approximate Max VO2, followed by an example using a 30-year-old female while walking."



7.  Announcements

PV Meeting Minutes - April 6, 2002
by Debbie Morrin-Norlund

The minutes from the last meeting were approved.

Reports:
Chair:
Eric received an email from Lynn Hazlewood about a $2,000 donation DC Masters made to the USMS endowment fund. Dave Church, Finance Chair, wrote a personal thank you note. DC Masters has been looking for ways to financially support the sport of swimming since 1974.

Treasurer:
Newsletter costs are up, convention costs were up for this year, but we're still breaking even.

Registrar:
Registration at this time in 2002 is 1446; for this time in 2001 it was 1491 and in 2000, 1390.

Newsletter:
Submissions for the next newsletter are due on April 15.

Awards:
Awards for swimmer of the year for SCY, LCM, and SCM will be presented at the Colonies Zone meet. Marilyn Redman is proposing that in the future we do swimmer of the year awards for all courses and age groups. The idea was approved. Each age group gets a combined SCY/LCM/SCM award (15 age groups x 2 sexes for 30 awards).

Officials:
USMS is working to finalize certification of the Masters meet officials? certification.

New Business:
Potential Delegates for the 2002 USMS Convention:
Dave Diehl (does not use a PV voting delegate slot)
Eric Nordlund (does not use a PV voting delegate slot)
Debbie Morrin-Nordlund
Marilyn Redman
Jeff Roddin
Joann Leilich requested that PVLMSC resubmit the USMS rule change proposal that relays not be last in USMS national meets.

The bylaws haven?t been updated since 1993. Jeff went through all meeting minutes since 1993. At the June 2002 meeting, he's proposing that we review the changes identified from those minutes for a vote on the bylaws at the 2002 Annual meeting.

It was requested that the December newsletter edition be changed to November. Also, the newsletter editor asked to be reimbursed for film developing.

Margot requested meet evaluators for future meets:

Larry Sloan

Colonies Zone meet

Jeff Roddin

Reston 2 mile lake swim

?

Terrapin 800/1500 meet

Next Meeting: June 30 (after the Terrapin 800/1500 meet), 11:30am, UMCP Campus Recreation Center.



Germantown Masters Summer Schedule

All USMS-registered swimmers are invited to participate in Germantown Masters' summer outdoor workouts. For registration forms, email waltersmrk@aol.com or call (301) 540-1591. Here is the 2002 summer schedule, which runs from May 28th through August 1st. Note that the weekday morning workouts are in a pool that is heated until June 15th:

  • Sundays 8-9:00 a.m. (1 hour)
  • Mondays 5:30-7:30 a.m. (2 hours)
  • Tuesdays 8:15-9:15 p.m. (1 hour)
  • Wednesdays 5:30-7:30 a.m. (2 hours)
  • Thursdays 8:15-9:15 p.m. (1 hour)
  • Fridays 5:30-7:30 a.m. (2 hours)

The registration fee has not been set yet, but will be in the registration form and on the team website as soon as it is.



Boston Light 10 Mile Swim August 24

The Boston Light Swim which has been in existence since 1908, is again being held in Boston Harbor, MA on August 24 at 7:00AM. For more information, contact John Werner, (617) 474-2400 johnwerner@citizenschools.org



Rob Whitters Promoted to Colonel

Rob Whitters, former Potomac Valley treasurer who was called to active duty, has been selected for promotion to Colonel. Congratulations, Rob



USA Swimming Meets Sanctioned for Masters
by Margot Pettijohn

The following USA swimming meets (age group meets) also have USMS sanction numbers. Please remind USMS swimmer that they need to register as a USA swimmer to be able to swim, make USMS records, and be insured in these meets.

Swimmingly, Margot Pettijohn

  • Maryland State May 31-Jun 2
  • PVS Senior I June 9
  • PVS Senior II June 23
  • PVS Senior Champs July 11-14
  • PVS Junior Champs July 19-21
  • PVS LC Distance Meet May 25-26

See www.pvmasters.org for more information.



Please Help USMS Record Swimming Histories


The History & Archives Committee has already collected stories and oral histories for 272 of your top athletes. One of their top priorities is to collect stories on 309 more athletes who have been named USMS All American six or more times. To see the list, which is divided by both Zone and LMSC, go to www.swimgold.org/zone on the web. USMS is hoping that each LMSC will write stories about their swimmers. The History & Archives Committee has a brochure on the web and in PDF format with guidelines for writing stories and where to send them. Thank you for helping USMS go down in history.



Joe Stewart to Swim the Patapsco River

Contact: Joe Stewart
3212 Avon Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland 21218
410-243-4418

On Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 8:00 a.m. Joe Stewart plans to swim across the mouth of the Patapsco River from Bodkin Point in Anne Arundel County to North Point in Baltimore County with the assistance of the United States Coast Guard, Chesapeake Bay Boston Whaler Club and Chesapeake Paddlers Association to heighten awareness about the state of this waterway and to raise funds for two groups which are involved in water protection: Sierra Club Task Force on the Patapsco and Baltimore Sanitary Sewer Oversight Coalition. To date he has raised over $4,000 in pledges for their work. The Task Force?s objectives are to protect and enhance this river and its forest preserve. The Coalition aims to promote measures to improve sewer systems affecting metropolitan Baltimore and educate the public about the gravity of the current failures of the aged system, especially as they impact Herring Run, Gwynns Falls and Jones Falls waterways.

Joe Stewart spent ten years organizing, coordinating and participating in open water swim events that have raised over $150,000 for AIDS service and environmental organizations. He recently turned over running the Maryland Swim For Life to Benefit People With HIV/AIDS and the Potomac River Swim for the Environment to new organizers and carried the Olympic Torch on Federal Hill December 22, 2001 in recognition of his efforts. He has turned his attention to the Patapsco River, close to his home in Baltimore City, because this is a body of water that has been badly abused and seriously neglected. He hopes someday it will become a river that is safe to fish and swim in, with tree-lined, litter-free banks, where people can walk along simple paths to find peace and strength from a crowded, concrete, stressful world.

For those wanting to go the next step, Joe suggests supporting the efforts of the Patapsco/Back Rivers Tributary Team, which its chairperson, Fran Flanigan, describes as "one of ten in Maryland appointed by the Governor to assist the state and local governments to carry out the provisions of the 1995 tributary strategies. In our watershed, we are dealing with major infrastructure problems, two big treatment plants that will need future upgrades, an urban stream system that needs restoration, and a large population that is not terribly attuned to the needs of its rivers".

A solo four-to-five mile swim raising a few thousand dollars is a drop in the bucket compared to the millions of dollars needed and huge commitment required to tackle replacing sewers, providing decent storm water management, and decontaminating one of the most impaired and polluted rivers in the country, but Joe Stewart believes it is a start and hopes others will join him in seeing the river as one worth saving and fighting for and if everyone begins to identify with the Patapsco as their river, the collective impact could be immeasurable!



Volunteer Opportunities
by CJ Lockman Hall

In past newsletters, we have talked about community service opportunities. If you?re still looking for ideas, here are a few places to start:

The Points of Light Foundation and Volunteer Center National Network
www.volunteerconnections.org/VCP_volunteercentermap.cfm
The Points of Light Foundation and Volunteer Center National Network coordinates nationwide activities to provide volunteer opportunities and resources.

Network for Good
networkforgood.org/volunteer
Network for Good helps you find local and online volunteer opportunities.

Local organizations that are always looking for a helping hand include the United Way, health-related organizations (cancer, leukemia, MS) and food banks.

You can participate in a one-day effort, such as working an aid station at a local running or cycling race or pitching in on a park clean up or Habitat for Humanity build.

Ideas for ongoing effort include:

  • sponsoring an under-served child
  • participating in Adopt-a-Road
  • sponsoring a food drive at your pool
  • providing swimsuits and caps for a local high school swim team
  • participating in the Special Olympics or KEEN programs, in which several of our PV members are actively involved
  • visiting elderly people, or serving as a Big Brother/Big Sister

Volunteering takes so little time, and its positive effects are more than you can imagine. Through your efforts, you might even meet some prospective members for your team!

If you or your team participates in community service activities, won't you drop me a line at PVTreasurer@usms.org? We would like to publish PVLMSC's individual and team efforts in an upcoming issue of the Swimmer's Ear. Your description of your activity might just light a spark in someone else.



Swim for Life
by Dawson Nash

For the last 2 years, Rolph's Wharf has hosted Swim for Life. This year marks the third year Swim for Life will take place at Rolph's. For those of you who are new to Swim for Life, the event began 11 years ago by Joe Stewart. Joe is a lawyer and activist from Baltimore whose passion for open water swimming has raised funds for organizations supporting people with HIV/AIDS and for environmental groups protecting waterways and the areas surrounding them.

Swim for Life is a one day event where swimmers raise a minimum of $100 and swim in either a 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mile wave starting at and returning to Rolph's Wharf. At last year?s event, 118 swimmers raised $30,000 for various HIV/AIDS and other organizations.

After coordinating Swim for Life for 10 years, Joe decided to concentrate on new projects. At last year's event, swimmers vowed to keep the event going. Joe asked the District of Columbia Aquatics Club (DCAC) if it wanted to pick up the baton. Dawson Nash, a member of the team and 2 time Swim for Life participant, wrote a proposal to the DCAC board outlining steps to ensure the success of the event and offered to coordinate the swim. The board accepted the proposal and Dawson began making arrangements. DCAC hopes to equal or surpass the number of swimmers and amount of funds raised on July 13th 2002.

Joe has been a big help to Dawson in preparing for this year's Swim for Life. Joe will also participate as a swimmer this year! To broaden the scope of beneficiaries for the event, a Request for Proposal was drafted and sent to small organizations that serve people with HIV/AIDS in DC, MD, and VA. Fourteen organizations responded and six were selected. Along with the Chester River Association, the beneficiaries are:

AIDS Legislative Committee (MD)
a grass-roots volunteer advocacy organization that represents the interests and views of persons living with HIV/AIDS, their families and service providers, and all Marylanders affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

Damien Ministries (DC)
fosters the dignity of people living with HIV/AIDS, particularly the poorest of the poor, by providing over 1,000 men, women, and children through its food bank, case management , outreach, and homeless initiatives.

EFFORTS (DC)
a community based organization that provides services to ex-offenders, substance abusers, and adjudicated adolescents challenged by HIV/AIDS who are in need of an outpatient treatment program.

Heart To Hand, Inc (MD)
serves over 540 clients in Prince George?s County challenged by psycho, social, and health related issues, specifically those affected by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS.

Pediatric AIDS/HIV Care (DC)
serves approximately 182 AIDS infected children in the greater Washington DC metropolitan area through a comprehensive program of quality therapeutic care and educational and recreational activities.

Quality of Life Retreats (DC)
provides weekend retreats for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

If you have never tried open water swimming, this is a perfect opportunity to do so and it?s for an excellent cause. DCAC is also looking for boaters and paddlers to assist in ensuring that the swim is safe. In the next week or so, brochures will be available for collecting sponsors. DCAC and Dawson are confident that swimmers and volunteers will make DCAC?s community event a big success and one that it can continue for many years to come.

For more information, please contact Dawson Nash by phone at 202-686-2150, by e-mail at swimmerdn4321@aol.com, or by mail at DCAC, PO Box 12211, Washington DC, 20005. Web: www.crosslink.net/~cherylw/sfl2002i.htm




8.  Classified


Coaching Opportunity

Assistant Coaching position open for summer under-18 MCSL swim team in Silver Spring MD. Pool is about 20 min. from UM campus. Email Jeff or the team representative Deborah Dokken for more information.



Coaching Opportunity

The District of Columbia Aquatic Club seeks candidates to fill the role of Head Coach. We are the PVMSC-affiliated gay and lesbian swim team for the Washington, D.C. area, open to all interested swimmers and coaches regardless of sexual orientation. We have about 140 team members and an excellent record of competitiveness in swim meets, including finishing 2nd overall at the Masters Long Course Nationals in 2000.

Duties include running 3-5 workouts per week, overseeing other swimmer-coaches, running stroke clinics, providing training information, and helping at meets, including the Annual Columbus Day Courses meet we hold each October. Pay will be commensurate with experience and regional standards, and travel to out-of-town meets is generally covered.

Interested candidates should contact Vivian Young, DCAC Competition Chair; or Robert Stofferson, DCAC Captain. We hope to have a new head coach lined up by the summer.



Coaching Opportunity

Ft. Belvoir Swim Team is seeking swim coaches for the 2002-03 swim year (Sept. - May/Aug). Positions will be available to coach 8 and under's and 9-12 year old groups. These groups range from one to four times per week. Masters swimmers have proven to be excellent coaches for us in the past. If you have coaching experience or an interest in becoming a coach please contact us. Practice sites are either in the Mt. Vernon area or on Ft. Belvoir. Salary dependent on hours and experience. For more information please contact head coach Kim Guthrie at 703 799-2225.



Volunteers Needed for Manhattan Island Swim

Andrew Johnson has been accepted into the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim (June 23rd, 2002 - 28.5 miles). The swim organizers are asking for volunteers:

Volunteers are needed for the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim event. You?ll get to see some great swimming while at the same time help the event run smoothly. The Volunteer page is at www.nycswim.org

Contact: Christopher J. Stephens 212-535-3054

fish



Wanted!! Boaters and Kayakers for Swim for Life

Volunteer boaters and kayakers are needed to ensure the safety of open water swimmers during Swim for Life on July 13, 2002. This is a beautiful area and free dinner, breakfast, lunch, and camping are provided. Info: DCAC/ Dawson Nash (202) 686-2150 www.crosslink.net/~cherylw/sfl2002i.htm



Backpacking/Outdoor Leadership Course

If you are looking for a killer 3-credit summer class, please sign up for my "backpacking and outdoor leadership class" - KNES 289E at the University of Maryland. It is from June 3--24. It includes a 5-day backpacking trip and 4 class periods held in the ORC. It rocks.

There are still some spots left. Please give me a call if you have any questions about the course.
Sincerely,
Jon F. McLaren
Director of Outdoor Programs
University of Maryland
301-226-4421
Fax: 301-226-4450



2002 Mexico Masters Swimming International

You are invited to join us and compete at one of the largest sports clubs in Mexico city Mexico, in the 2002 Mexico Masters Swimming International Berimbau 1st. Cup http://swimmex.homestead.com/b.html June 26th through the 29th. Take advantage of a beautiful opportunity to compete in this special invitation from the largest city in the world. This well-known sports club has a 50 m. outdoor pool and a 25 m. indoor pool making it more than capable of handling this larger event.

Along with the incredible opportunities in competing with us, you will have the opportunity of visiting our beautiful country of Mexico. Arrangements have been made for beautiful hotel accommodations, transportation and tours of our local tourists areas will be available upon request.

Please consider this opportunity to take your family with you and enjoy the Masters swimming competition and incorporate a beautiful vacation in Mexico.

Mexico City is centrally located and many of the beautiful locations are a short distance by bus or plane, which can be arranged easily by a highly recommended travel agency Viajes Gerpa S.A. de C.V. here in the Mexico City. Also Acapulco and Cancun are only a few minutes air travel from Mexico City. I almost forgot to mention the incredible food here in Mexico, is just darn right delicious.

So please pass this information on to any and all of your nearby swimming clubs, friends and dedicated swimming athletes who would love to compete in the 2002 Mexico Masters Swimming International Berimbau 1st Cup.

If you would like further information please contact us at: swimmex@onebox.com. Or call us toll free in the USA at 1-866 206-9075 ext. 9697 to leave a message or a fax (when faxing after you enter the extension push 2 then start your fax). To sign up, go to our web page below and print forms and then fax them to us To view our facilities for this event please feel free to visit us at http://swimmex.homestead.com/b.html For Berimbau general information see www.berimbau.com.mx



A.S.A. Postal Swim

ASA is holding their first postal event: the 2002 A.S.A. 3300 yard Postal National Championship. We have at least two other postal championships scheduled for this year (a 3000 LCM coming up in May and a 5000 yd in Oct.) Meanwhile, members can submit times achieved in any meet (USMS, USA Swimming, NCAA, YNats, etc.) for consideration for our single-year age group world, national, and state records for short course meters, long course meters, or short course yards (including the new world records for yards). We'd sure appreciate your support. Thanks.

Contact Us at: 512-327-1900 or info@adultswimming.com www.adultswimming.com



Sale on Wetsuits

In order to help our customers during the economic recession, we have introduced new cheap freight charges for purchases of 30 wetsuits or more. It only costs USD $250.00 for a door to door delivery of 30 wetsuits (surface mail). It takes about 60 days.

Child size: S011 USD $11.00 (S, M, L)
S012 USD $13.00 (S, M, L)

Adult size: S013 USD $14.5 (Men : S, M, L, XL)

S015 USD $13.00 (Ladies : S, M, L)
S015 USD $15.00 (Men : S, M,L, XL)

S014 USD $15.00 (Ladies : S, M,L )
S014 USD $17.00 (Men : S, M, L, XL)

Please email for our catalog. TINSHAN VILLAGE HOUJIE DONGGGUAN GUANDONG, CHINA (ATTN: Jenny) Tel:(86-769)-5816119 Fax:(86-769)-5816119 E-mail: jenny@rmb.com.hk



9.  Photo Credits

  • Eric Nordlund - photo by Debbie Morrin-Nordllund
  • CJ Hall - photo by Debbie Morrin-Nordlund
  • Holly Donnelly ? photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Nick Olmos-Lau - photo by Nancy Thomas
  • College Park Bike Shop - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Guy in flooded phonebooth - Joke for the Day
  • Cheryl Wagner - photo by Eric Nordlund
  • Penny Bates - www.geocities.com/yosemite/2855/ladies.html
  • Holly Donnelly - photo by friend of Holly
  • Margot Pettijohn - photo by Holly Donnelly
  • Feinstein, Dobry - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Denes, friends - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Gregg, Kirkendall - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Anna Ratliff - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Susan and Joann - Cheryl Wagner
  • Elshafei, Wagner, Benedick - bystander
  • Annemiek Van Der Sluijs - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Holly Donnelly - photo by Cheryl Wagner
  • Olver, Weiss - photo by Penny Bates
  • Sax, Geiszler - photo by Penny Bates
  • Evans, Grill - photo by Penny Bates
  • Van Pelt-Diller, Dad - photo by Penny Bates


10.  Events Calendar


2002 Pool Calendar

June 23
GMU Patriot Masters Long Course Classic www.pvmasters.org/entry.htm

June 26-29
2002 Mexico Masters Swimming International http://swimmex.homestead.com/b.html Email: swimmex@onebox.com. Toll free in the USA at 1-866 206-9075 ext. 9697 to leave a message or a fax (when faxing after you enter the extension push 2 then start your fax).

June 30
Terrapin Masters 800/1500 LCM Meet; University of MD Campus Rec; College Park, MD Dave Diehl, www.crosslink.net/~cherylw/meet800.htm

July 7
DCRP Hains Point 22nd Annual Long Course Meet www.pvmasters.org/entry.htm

August 4
DCM 17th Annual LC Meet at George Mason University www.pvmasters.org/entry.htm

August 15-18
USMS Long Course Nationals @ Cleveland State Univ www.mindspring.com/~lakeeriemasters/lcnats.htm

October 12
DCAC/ACDC 2002 Swim Meet; Prince Georges Sports & Learning Complex, 8001 Sheriff Road, Landover, Maryland ATTN: Dawson Nash 4514 Connecticut Ave NW #503; Washington, DC 20008 Phone: 202-686-2150 Email: swimmerdn4321@aol.com



2002 Open Water Calendar

May 25
Swim Around Key West 12.5 miles Key West, FL Info: Lori Bosco, (305) 296-9081 ext. 362 email: aqualb@aol.com

May 26
Jim McDonnell 2-Mile Swim - Lk Audubon, Reston, VA OW; Phyllis Sickenberger, 1807 Post Oak Tr, Reston, VA 20191, 703-845-SWIM, pbberger@aol.com ; Lynn Hazlewood, lynhzlwd@usms.org ; http://restonmasters.org

May 15-Sep 30
5 & 10K Postal National Championship run by Sawtooth Masters Jill Wright,1626 Williams St., Boise, ID 83706 email: jeig@innova.net

June ?
1 mile Ocean City, MD USLA swim Info: Tom Lott (800) 927-3320 OR (800) 927-6410

June 1
Potomac River 7.5 Mile Swim Pt. Lookout State Park, MD; Info: Cheryl Wagner (202) 387-2361

June 1
Two-Mile Charleston Harbor Swim. Mount Pleasant, SC. www.rcctherapy.com

June 8
1.3 Mile Bay Swim-Around Fenton Island, Atlantic City, NJ: Starts at 6:15pm from Albany Ave Bridge (Wonder Bar & Grill) around Fenton Island and return. Contact Kara K. Cassidy, 311 Montpelier Ave, Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234 Email Seacat4shore@aol.com or call 609-653-0939

June 15
2002 USMS 10K Open Water Championship; Hartwell Lake, Clemson, SC OW; Jacque Grossman, Clemson Aquatic Team, PO Box 411, Clemson, SC 29633-0411, 864-654-4704, 864-646-8836 (d), jelg@innova.net ; Sponsored by Clemson Aquatic Team; Sanctioned by SC LMSC

June 15
Jack King 1-Mi Ocean Swim - Virginia Beach, VA OW; Betsy Durrant, 211 66th St, Virginia Beach, VA 23451, 757-422-6811(h), durrant6@home.com ; www.vaswim.org ; Sanctioned by VA LMSC">

June 16
Great Chesapeake Bay 4.4 Mile Swim & 1 Mile Bay Challenge, Bay Bridge Marina, at Sandy Point St. Park, MD www.lin-mark.com

June 23
Manhattan Swim 28.5 miles NY, NY

June 28
Independence Day 1 Mile Bay Swim - Friday, June 28, 2002 ? Somers Point, NJ www.lmsports.com

June 29
Madison Mile - CT OW Champs - Madison, CT OW; Dave Parcells, 837 Boston Post Rd #71, Madison, CT 06443, 203-605 4137, dpchan1209@aol.com; www.shoreline.org ; Sanctioned by CT LMSC">

June 30
Plunge for Patients 1 Mile & 3 Mile Swims - Wildwood, NJ www.lmsports.com

July 13
Swim for Life 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 Mile Swim Chester River, MD; Info: DCAC/Dawson Nash (202) 686-2150 swimmerdn4321@aol.com www.crosslink.net/~cherylw/sfl2002i.htm

July 13
2002 USMS 2-Mile Cable Championship - Chris Greene Lake, Charlottesville, VA OW; Patty Powis, 2112 Waters Mill Pointe, Richmond, VA 23235-2915, 804-272-7291, ppowis@aol.com ; Sponsored by Virginia Masters Swim Team; Sanctioned by VA LMSC

July 13
Swim for the Dolphins 1 Miler; Wildwood Crest, NJ www.lmsports.com

July 21
Cove to Cove .5 mile swim; Battery Park, NY www.nycswim.com

July 21
Race for the River 2.4 miles NY, NY www.nycswim.com

July 27
Ocean City Masters 1 Mile Swim - Ocean City, NJ www.lmsports.com

August ?
2.4 mile Ocean City, MD USLA swim Info: Tom Lott (800) 927-3320 OR (800) 927-6410

August 3
1.7 Mi Citizens Bank/Save the Bay Swim - Newport, RI OW; Jennifer Wheeler, Save the Bay, 434 Smith St, Providence, RI 02908, 401-272-3540, jwheeler@savebay.org ; www.savebay.org ; Entry Deadline 7/15/2002

August 3
1.3 Mile or a 5 K Bridge to Bridge Bay Race, Albany Ave Bridge, Atlantic City, NJ, (Black Horse Pike & the Wonder Bar), Contact Kara K. Cassidy, 311 Montpelier Ave, Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234 Email: Seacat4Shore@aol.com or call 609-6539 Web site: http://www.Apexswim.com 5:30pm start, Start & Awards at Wonder Bar and Grill.

August 4
Park to Park One-Miler NY, NY www.nycswim.com

August 4
FINA World Cup IV Marathon Swim Atlantic City, NJ www.acswim.org/

August 4
1 Mile Ocean Swim, Wildwood, NJ, 6:30pm start (Lincoln Ave at Beach Patrol HQ); Ruth Manlandro (609) 522-5652 & L&M Sports, 89 Park Drive, Berlin, NJ www.LMSports.com

August 10
1.5 Mi Open Water - Mirror Lake, Lake Placid, NY OW; Ann Svenson, PO Box 425, Greenfield Center, NY 12833, 518-893-1967, annb48@earthlink.net www.adms.org/LP_Swim/Lake_Placid_OW_Swim.html ; Sanctioned by AD LMSC

August 11
2.2 Mile Bay Swim, Somers Point, NJ: Polly Caffrey, PO Box 850, Pomona, NJ 08240 (609-404-1591). Wet suits allowed. Start time to be determined Based on tides. Check in at Somers Point Kennedy Park. Pollyphish@aol.com Web: www.thieler.com/rainbow

August 17
Great Hudson River Swim 2.8 miles NY, NY www.nycswim.com

August 24
Boston Light Swim 10 miles; Boston Harbor, MA; Info: John Werner (617) 474-2400 johnwerner@citizenschools.org

August 24
1 Mile Inlet Swim (YATES) - Captain Francis Bennett, Atlantic City Beach Patrol, Public Safety Bldg, 2715 Atlantic Ave, Suite 420, Atlantic City, NJ 08401. 6:45 PM start (609) 347-5466 or http://www.ACSwim.org Check in at Gardners Basin, North end of Atlantic City & go to the bay side.(800 N. New Hampshire Ave)(next to Flying Cloud Rest.)

August 24
XMEN's Third Annual Open Water Swim, 2 and 5 Mile Wrightsville Beach, NC, Saturday, August 24, 2002 www.ncmasters.org/forms/13204.pdf

September 1
1.5 Mile AC Pageant Ocean Swim, Bill Brooks, Atlantic City Beach Patrol, Public Safety Building, 2715 Atlantic Ave, Suite 420, Atlantic City, NJ 08041 9:45 AM start (609) 347-5466 Fax: (609) 347-5211 (in front Of The Showboat Casino) Web site: http://www.ACSwim.org

September 6
Jersey Classic 1 Mile Ocean Swim, Atlantic City, NJ,Start at Albany Ave & Beach, 700M Out/ 200 Meters North/ 700 Meters in, Finish in front of the Hilton Hotel, immediately before The World Cup Pasta Dinner and Rules Meeting. Contact: Kara Cassidy, 311 Montpelier Ave Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234, email: Seacat4shore@aol.com or Call 609-653-0939 Web Site: www.Apexswim.com

September 6
Seacat 2002 Jersey Classic Mile; Atlantic City, NJ Info: www.apexswim.com Email: seacat4shore@aol.com Phone: 609-653-0939

September 7
2002 FINA Marathon Swimming World Cup / 10K for the USA Atlantic City, NJ (open to Masters) www.acswim.org

September 21
Sunfest 1K, 3K, 5K Swim Ocean City, MD Info: Ken Zuiderhof at 301-934-3675 or email kzuiderhof@mail.ccboe.com

September 21
Little Red Lighthouse Swim 7.8 miles NY, NY www.nycswim.com

September 21
Escape From Fort Delaware 1 Mile Delaware River Swim, from Fort Delaware (Revolutionary War prison) (Pea Patch Island) to Delaware City, Delaware, and registration at Clinton Street & the river. Contact Ray Teden, E-mail: Rap601@aol.com or call (302) 322-9584. Festival going on at the same time.

September 21
September Splash 1/4 & 1 mile swims - Wildwood Crest, NJ www.lmsports.com/



Local Multi-sport Calendar February-June 2002
by CJ Lockman Hall

Confirm race time, date and location with race website or director. The next newsletter will come out in May, however, it is a good idea to look into July and August races now!

May 10-12
The 8th Endorphin FIX Adventure Race, New River Gorge Natl. Park, WV; 125 mile Pro, 75 miles Sport; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

May 12
The Flannery Fitness Duathlon, Poolesville HS, Poolesville, MD; 5K run, 27K bike, 5K run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

May 18
Smith Mountain Lake Triathlon, Huddleston, VA; 750-meter swim, 20K bike, 5K run; www.commonwealthgames.org; Virginia Amateur Sports Inc., 711-C 5th St. NE, Roanoke, VA, 24016; 540-343-0987

May 19
Columbia Triathlon, Sesquicentennial Park, Ellicott City, MD; 1.5K swim, 41K bike, 10K run; www.tricolumbia.org, events@tricolumbia.org; EVENT CLOSED, wait list full

May 19
The Inaugural C&O Adventure Triathlon, Brunswick, MD; 20+ miles; canoe/kayak, run/bike on C&O Trail, run in Brunswick; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

May 19
Make-A-Wish Kids Triathlon, Silver Spring, MD; http://www.wish.org; Make-A-Wish Foundation of the Mid-Atlantic, 10920 Connecticut Ave, # 1600, Kensington, MD, 20895, 301.962.6500

June 2
Shady Grove Sprint Triathlon, Shady Grove YMCA, Richmond, VA; 300-meter pool swim, 11-mile bike, 5K run; www.set-upinc.com; Set-Up, Inc., Box 15144, Wilmington, NC, 28408; 910-458-0299

June 2
The 6th Annual Cape May Duathlon and Triathlon, Bellplain State Forest, Cape May County, NJ; triathlon: 0.4-mile swim, 15-mile bike, 2.7-mile run; duathlon: 2.7-mile run, 15-mile bike, 2.7-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

June 2
Breezy Point Triathlon, Norfolk, VA; 1K swim, 20K bike, 5K run; www.breezypointtri.com, bvirok@breezypointtri.com; Betty Virok, 793 Coverdale Ct., Virginia Beach, VA, 23452; 757- 431-2982 (eve)

June 5-9
BEAST of the East, Massanutten Mtn. Resort, Harrisonburg, VA; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

June 8
2nd Annual Escape From Ft. Delaware Triathlon, Delaware City, DE; 1.5K swim (wetsuits mandatory), 40K bike, 10K run; www.pirhana-sports.com, triathlon@diamondstategames.com; Diamond State Games, 4142 Ogletown Stanton Rd. #222, Newark, DE 19713; 302-731-1676

June 9
Blackwater EagleMan Triathlon, Sailwinds Park, Cambridge, MD; 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run; www.tricolumbia.org, events@tricolumbia.org; 410-964-1246; Hawaii IronMan Qualifier; AGE GROUP ENTRIES CLOSED, PRO SLOTS AVAILABLE

June 15
Thundergust Sprint Triathlon, Parvin State Park, Pittsgrove, NJ; 0.4-mile lake swim, 16-mile bike, 4.5-mile run on shaded wooded trails; www.lin-mark.com; USAT sanctioned & officiated

June 16
The 9th Annual Spud Triathlon, General Smallwood State Park, Indian Head, MD; Long: 1-mile swim, 25-mile bike, 6.2-mile run; Short: 0.5-mile swim, 15-mile bike, 3-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

June 16
The 15th Marathon Sports Sprint Triathlon, Middletown, DE; 0.25-mile swim, 16-mile bike, 3-mile run; www.races2run.com, wayne@bellatlantic.net; Wayne Kursh, Marathon Sports, P.O. Box 24, Montchanin, DE, 19710; 302-654-6400

June 22-23
Xterra East Championship, Richmond, VA; full: 1.5K swim, 30K mtn. bike, 11K run; half: 750-meter swim, 15K mtn. bike, 5.5K run; www.xterraplanet.com, info@xterraplanet.com; Todd Jackson, Team Unltd., 1001 Bishop St., # 880, Pauahi Tower, Honolulu, HI, 96813; 877-751-8880

June 23
CANCELLED!! D.C. Capital Triathlon, Washington, DC; 1000-meter swim, 14.9-mile bike, 3.1-mile run; www.envirosports.com, info@envirosports.com

June 23
The Inaugural Potomac Triathlon, Dahlgren, VA; 0.75-mile swim, 18-mile bike, 5-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

June 23
Tri-America Series #3, Hampton, VA; 1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run; www.usatri.com, info@usatri.com; Fred Sommers, Sommer Sports, Box 121236, Clermont, FL, 34712-1236; 352-394-1320, USAT sanctioned

July 7
The 16th Annual Mason-Dixon Triathlon and Duathlon, Gifford Pinchot State Park, Lewisberry, PA; Triathlon: 0.75-mile swim, 17.6-mile bike, 3-mile run; Duathlon: 3-mile run, 17.6-mile bike, 3-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

July 27/28
Odyssey One-Day Adventure Race, Big Island, VA; 80-mile Pro class, 50-mile Adventure class; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

July 28
Riverwatch Triathlon & Duathlon, North East, MD; 0.75-mile swim (tri) 3-mile run (du), 16-mile bike, 3-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

July ??
Pohanka YMCA Colonial Triathlon, Colonial Beach, VA; 1K swim, 40K bike, 10K run; Terry McLaughlin, 212 Butler Rd., Falmouth, VA, 22405; 540-371-9622, USAT sanctioned

August 3
Seal Adventure Challenge, VA Beach, VA; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

August 4
Limbo Triathlon, Lake Whittier, Frederick, MD; 400-meter pool swim, 13-mile bike, 3-mile run; www.erols.com/cbare/limbo/Limbo.htm; Chuck Bare, 803 Shawnee Dr., Frederick, MD, 21701; cbare@erols.com

August 4
Cambridge Duathlon, Thurmont, MD; 0.5-mile swim, 12-mile mtn. bike, 2.5-mi run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

August 11
The Inaugural Cape Henlopen Triathlon, Cape Henlopen, DE; 1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

August 24
Gateway to the Mountains Fat Tire Triathlon, Thurmont, MD; 0.5-mile swim, 12-mile bike, 2.5-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 2
The Labor Day Triathlon, McLean, VA; 200-meter swim, 3-mile bike, 1.3-mile run; www.triitnow.com, ina@triitnow.com; Ina Nenninger, 2711 Belleforest Ct. #306, Vienna, VA, 22180; 703-849-1474

September 6
Odyssey Triple Triathlon, Spotsylvania County, VA; 7.2-mile swim, 336-mile bike, 78.6-mile run; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

September 7
Odyssey Double Triathlon, Spotsylvania County, VA; 4.8-mile swim, 224-mile bike, 56.4-mile run; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

September 7
Odyssey Half Iron Triathlon, Spotsylvania County, VA; 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

September 7
Deep Creek Adventure Race, McHenry, MD; canoe/kayak, trail run, mtn. bike, challenges, 2.5-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 8
Deep Creek Lake Triathlon, McHenry, MD; 1K swim, 20K bike, 8K run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 8
Star Bangled Triathlon, Baltimore, MD; 1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run; www.tricolumbia.org; starspangledtri@tricolumbia.org; Robert Vigorito, 6662 Windsor C, Columbia, MD, 21044; 410-964-1246

September 8
Delaware Half Ironman, Bear, DE; 1.2-mile swim, 55.3-mile bike; 13.1-mile run; www.piranha-sports.com, nsemmel@piranha-sports.com

September 8
Reston Triathlon, Reston, VA; 1-mile swim, 22.5-mile bike, 10K run; www.restontriathlon.org, restontri@aol.com; Bonita Bonnes, 11654 Plaza America Dr., Reston, VA, 20190; 703-476-7874

September 14
Mid-Atlantic Regional Championship: 7th Annual Dewey Beach Sprint Triathlon, Dewey Beach, DE; www.deweybeachtriathlon.com, wava@dmv.com; 302-226-0510

mid-Sept.
Sandman Triathlon, VA Beach, VA; 1K swim, 14-mile bike, 5K run; more information available at later date

September 21
Outback Big Lick Triathlon, Smith Mountain, VA; 1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run; www.set-upinc.com; Set-Up, Inc., Box 15144, Wilmington, NC, 28408; 910-458-0299

September 21
Odyssey Off-Road Triathlon, Sherando Lake Rec Area, VA; 0.9-mile swim, 8-mile mtn. run, 22-mile mtn. bike; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

September 21
Odssey Off-Road Duathlon, Sherando Lake Rec Area, VA; 8-mile run, 12-mile mtn. bike; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

September 22
To the Point Triathlon, 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.3-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 22
To the Point Duathlon, St. Mary's County, MD; 6.2-mile run, 56-mile bike, 13.3-mile run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 22
Make-A-Wish Sea Colony Triathlon, Bethany Beach, DE; 1.5K swim, 36K bike, 10K run; www.tricolumbia.org, events@tricolumbia.org; 410-964-1246

September 27
TRI-Umph Classic! Mini Triathlon, Richmond, VA; 400-meter swim, 20K bike, 5K run; www.aarp.org/triumph, triumphclassip@aarp.org; AARP, 601 E. St., NW, Washington DC, 20049; 866-812-AARP; **must be 50 or older to enter

September 29
Ocean Adventure Race, Assateague State Park, MD; ocean kayak, swim, beach run, mtn. bike, challenges; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

September 29
Hi-Tec Adventure Racing Series #7, Washington, DC; www.mesp.com, Kimberly.Moran@Octagon.com; Kimberly Moran 818-707-8866 *18

September 29
2nd Annual Lums Pond Duathlon & Triathlon, Bear, DE; 0.5-mile swim (tri) 2-mile cross-country (du), 19.5-mile bike, 3.1-mile cross-country run; www.piranha-sports.com, nsemmel@piranha-sports.com; 302-836-4981

October 5
Osprey Sprint Triathlon, Public Landing, MD; 0.5-mile swim, 15.2-mile bike, 3.4-mile run; director@mdcoastalbays.org; David Blazer, 9609 Stephen Decatur Hwy., Berlin, MD, 21811; 410-213-2297

October 6
The Inaugural Jersey Duathlon, Meadowlands Sports Complex, E. Rutherford, NJ; 3-mile run, 20-mile bike, 3-mile run (race contingent on venue football schedule)

Oct. 20 or 27
Duathlon on the Bay, Annapolis, MD; 5K run, 20K bike, 5K run; Triathlantic, www.triath.com, jaeger@erols.com; 410-593-9662

October 11
Mega Dose Adventure Race, Natural Bridge, VA; 200-mile Pro, 125-mile Sport; www.oarevents.com, oarinfo@aol.com; Don Mann, Odyssey Adventure Racing, 1109 Windsor Rd., Virginia Beach, VA, 23451; 757-425-2445

for details and more events:
www.active.com
www.cooltri.com
www.insidetri.com/calendar
www.lin-mark.com
www.oarevents.com
www.paadventureracing.com
www.set-upinc.com
www.triath.com
www.triathlete.com
www.tricolumbia.org